Overview

Abnormal Loss of Appetite and Too Weak to Walk 244 Causes


The virtual doctor has found 244 conditions that can cause Abnormal Loss of Appetite and Too Weak to Walk.

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There are 28 common conditions that can cause Abnormal Loss of Appetite and Too Weak to Walk.
  1. Bacterial Gastroenteritis
  2. Bacterial Pneumonia
  3. Bladder Infection
  4. Bronchitis
  5. Cervical Lymphadenitis
  6. COPD
  7. Deviated Septum
  8. Emphysema
  9. Food Poisoning
  10. Gastritis
  11. Gastroenteritis
  12. Hangover
  13. Influenza
  14. Iron Deficient Anemia
  15. Jet Lag
  16. Major Depression
  17. Motion Sickness
  18. Pneumonia
  19. Sinusitis
  20. Tonsillitis
  21. Upper Respiratory Infections in Children
  22. Upper Respiratory Infections
  23. Urinary Tract Infection
  24. Urinary Tract Infections in Children
  25. Vaginal Bleeding after Delivery
  26. Viral Gastroenteritis
  27. Viral Pharyngitis
  28. Viral Syndrome
There are 34 somewhat common conditions that can cause Abnormal Loss of Appetite and Too Weak to Walk.
  1. Alcoholic Hepatitis
  2. Anemia
  3. Angiodysplasia
  4. Bipolar Disorder
  5. Campylobacter Enteritis
  6. Congestive Heart Failure
  7. Diabetic Nephropathy
  8. Drug Side Effect
  9. Dysthymia
  10. Enlarged Heart
  11. Epstein Barr Infection
  12. Erythema Infectiosum
  13. Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease
  14. Heart Attack
  15. Heat Illness
  16. Hepatitis A
  17. Hepatitis B
  18. Kidney Disease
  19. Malabsorption
  20. Mononucleosis
  21. Mycoplasma Infection
  22. Peptic Ulcer Disease
  23. Roseola
  24. Rotavirus
  25. Staph Infections
  26. Streptococcal Tonsillitis
  27. Stress Reaction
  28. Swine Flu
  29. Traveler's Diarrhea
  30. Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding
  31. Vaginal Bleeding after Hysterectomy
  32. Viral Exanthem
  33. Viral Hepatitis
  34. Viral Pneumonia
There are 47 uncommon conditions that can cause Abnormal Loss of Appetite and Too Weak to Walk.
  1. Actinomycosis
  2. AIDS
  3. Alcoholic Cardiomyopathy
  4. Ankylosing Spondylitis
  5. Anorexia Nervosa
  6. Bacterial Endocarditis
  7. Celiac Sprue
  8. Chicken Pox
  9. Chlamydia Pneumonia
  10. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
  11. Cirrhosis
  12. Crohn's Disease
  13. Cytomegalovirus Infection
  14. Cytomegalovirus Intestinal Infection
  15. Cytomegalovirus Pneumonia
  16. Diabetic Ketoacidosis
  17. Electrolyte Imbalance
  18. Esophageal Ulcers
  19. Esophageal Varices
  20. Fungal Lung Infection
  21. Hashimoto's Thyroiditis
  22. Hepatitis C
  23. High Altitude Illness
  24. HIV Infection
  25. Hypernatremia
  26. Hypertensive Cardiomyopathy
  27. Hyponatremia
  28. Hypothyroidism
  29. Klebsiella Pneumonia
  30. Labyrinthitis
  31. Lead Poisoning
  32. Megaloblastic Anemia
  33. Meningitis
  34. Osteomyelitis
  35. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
  36. Pernicious Anemia
  37. Polymyalgia Rheumatica
  38. Postpartum Depression
  39. Rheumatoid Arthritis
  40. Salmonella Infection
  41. Sickle Cell Anemia
  42. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lung
  43. Theophylline Toxicity
  44. Thyroiditis
  45. Tick Borne Illness
  46. Uterine Tumor
  47. Viral Meningitis
There are 135 rare conditions that can cause Abnormal Loss of Appetite and Too Weak to Walk.
  1. Abetalipoproteinemia
  2. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia
  3. Acute Myelogenous Leukemia
  4. Acute Tubular Necrosis
  5. Addison's Disease
  6. Adenocarcinoma of the Bronchus
  7. Amebic Dysentery
  8. Anal Cancer
  9. Aplastic Anemia
  10. Atypical Mycobacterial Infection
  11. Babesiosis
  12. Beriberi
  13. Bird Flu
  14. Bladder Cancer
  15. Blastomycosis
  16. Bone Tumor
  17. Botulism
  18. Brucellosis
  19. Bubonic Plague
  20. Burkitt Lymphoma
  21. Cerebral Lymphoma
  22. Cervical Cancer
  23. Chagas Disease
  24. Cholangitis
  25. Cholera
  26. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
  27. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia
  28. Chronic Persistent Hepatitis
  29. Ciguatera
  30. Coccidioidomycosis
  31. Colorado Tick Fever
  32. Colorectal Cancer
  33. Congo Hemorrhagic Fever
  34. Cryptococcal Infection
  35. Discoid Lupus
  36. Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever
  37. Ehrlichiosis
  38. End Stage Renal Disease
  39. Endomyocardial Eosinophilic Fibrosis
  40. Eosinophilic Pneumonia
  41. Equine Encephalitis
  42. Esophageal Cancer
  43. Extraintestinal Amebiasis
  44. Familial Adenomatous Polyposis
  45. Felty's Syndrome
  46. Gallbladder Cancer
  47. Gardner's Syndrome
  48. Gastric Carcinoma
  49. Hairy Cell Leukemia
  50. Hemochromatosis
  51. Hemolytic Anemia
  52. Hepatitis D
  53. Hepatitis E
  54. Hodgkin's Disease
  55. Hyperparathyroidism
  56. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy
  57. Hypopituitarism
  58. Ischemic Cardiomyopathy
  59. Japanese Encephalitis
  60. Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis
  61. Large Cell Carcinoma of the Lung
  62. Laryngeal Cancer
  63. Legionnaire's Disease
  64. Leukemia
  65. Listeriosis
  66. Lung Cancer
  67. Lupus
  68. Lyme Disease
  69. Lymphoma
  70. Malaria
  71. Medullary Cystic Disease
  72. Membranous Glomerulonephritis
  73. Mesothelioma
  74. Moraxella Pneumonia
  75. Multiple Myeloma
  76. Mumps
  77. Myelodysplastic Syndrome
  78. Necrotizing Fasciitis
  79. Nephrotic Syndrome
  80. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma
  81. Norwalk Virus Infection
  82. Osteosarcoma
  83. Ovarian Cancer
  84. Pancreatic Cancer
  85. Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria
  86. Patent Ductus Arteriosus
  87. Peritonitis
  88. Peritonsillar Abscess
  89. Pneumocystis Pneumonia
  90. Postpartum Cardiomyopathy
  91. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis
  92. Prostate Cancer
  93. Pseudomembranous Colitis
  94. Pulmonary Actinomycosis
  95. Pyelonephritis
  96. Renal Cell Carcinoma
  97. Renal Tubular Acidosis
  98. Restrictive Cardiomyopathy
  99. Reye's Syndrome
  100. Rift Valley Fever
  101. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
  102. Rubella
  103. Sarcoidosis
  104. SARS
  105. Schistosomiasis
  106. Secondary Hyperparathyroidism
  107. Sepsis
  108. Shigella Infection
  109. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Lung
  110. Smallpox
  111. Spherocytosis
  112. Syndrome of Inappropriate ADH
  113. Syphilis
  114. Tapeworm
  115. Testicular Cancer
  116. Tetralogy of Fallot
  117. Thalassemia
  118. Throat Cancer
  119. Thyroid Cancer
  120. Toxic Shock Syndrome
  121. Toxoplasmosis
  122. Trichinosis
  123. Tricuspid Insufficiency
  124. Tropical Sprue
  125. Tuberculosis
  126. Typhus
  127. Ulcerative Colitis
  128. Uterine Cancer
  129. Volvulus
  130. Vulvar Cancer
  131. Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia
  132. Wegener's Granulomatosis
  133. Wilms Tumor
  134. Wilson's Disease
  135. Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome

Last Updated: Mar 1, 2010 References
Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D. Scott Gettings, MD
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References
  1. Ferri's Clinical Advisor, Fred F. Ferri - 2007
  2. Griffith's 5-Minute Clinical Consult, Mark Dambro - 2006
  3. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, Anthony S. Fauci, Eugene Braunwald, Dennis L. Kasper, Stephen L. Hauser, Dan L. Longo, J. Larry Jameson, Joseph Loscalzo - 2008
  4. Emergency medicine: a comprehensive study guide; Judith E. Tintinalli, Gabor D. Kelen, J. Stephan Stapczynski - 2004
  5. Nelson textbook of pediatrics, Robert Kliegman, Richard E. Behrman, Waldo Emerson Nelson - 2007